What To Expect From Latin Night

Published: 08 March 2019

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Dancing With The Stars Dance Recap: Episode 4
Dancing With The Stars Dance Recap: Episode 4
You're watching Dancing With The Stars Dance Recap: Episode 4 Relive all the glitz and the glamour of Dancing With The Stars, Episode 4

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Latin Night sure did raise the heat! What did it look like? A whole lot of saucy dancing. Here are some of the most popular Latin dances we saw on Episode 4 of Dancing With The Stars.

Samba

Samba is an Afro-Brazilian style of dance with a lot of variations. Whether it’s performed as a group during a Brazilian street party, or as a pair on the ballroom dancefloor – Samba influences many dance types.

The ballroom Samba is derived from the Rocking Samba. It consists of body isolations and knee jerks, create a bouncing effect.

Check out Curtly and Siobhan nailing this move in episode 2!

Rumba 

The Rumba is the mysterious seductress of Latin dance. It’s flirtatious, smooth and draws upon other dances for inspiration such as the Cubon Son, the Bolero and the Guaracha. One of the slower Latin styles, the Rumba is sassy, sensuous, and danced in a box pattern to accentuate the hips. If this dance was a woman – she would definitely steal your man.

See how Jimmy and Alex point their toes diagonally? This makes for maximum hip movement (and sexiness).

Cha-Cha

Undoubtedly the most popular Latin dance we’ve seen so far, the Cha-Cha has gotten our celebrities and dancers to shimmy and shake across the dancefloor!

The Cha-Cha requires lots of hip action, synchronised steps, and a classic move called the ‘New Yorker’, which allows the dancers to quickly swivel on their feet. It looks pretty damn hard to nail, and is one of the most impressive dances when done right.

Find out more about this Cuban dance!

Paso Doble

Paso Doble – the dance that is as hard to pronounce as it is to perfect. This dance imitates a matador facing a bull in a traditional Spanish bullring. If Miguel was a dance move, it’d be this one. 

One of the most dramatic of all Latin dances, the Paso Doble requires the dancers to be confident and proud.

Watch out for the ‘Apel’, a move in which the male performer stamps his foot to impersonate a matador capturing the attention of the bull. Talk about a power move.

Tango

The Tango originated from the working-class port neighbourhoods of Montevideo and Buenos Aires. Influenced by African rhythms with European instruments, the Tango has transformed and evolved over time to now include everything from the Ballroom Tango to the Argentine Tango.

What’s the difference, you ask? Well, the Ballroom Tango is a basic eight count step, performed to a steady tempo, while the Argentine Tango has a varied tempo, which allows the dancers to improvise. That’s ad lib Latin dancing for you.

See how the celebrities and performers swirl across the dancefloor in a curve-like fashion? That’s because the dance is commonly performed around dining tables and chairs at an event! FACT.

Jive

A popular dance amongst American youth in the roaring 20s, but brought to Europe by American soldiers in WWII. The Jive was a secretive dance, only performed in underground clubs and bars for many years. Now it’s one of the most popular dance styles and performed across the globe.

The Jive is a fast dance performed to swing music and includes lots of flicks, kicks and perfectly pointed toes. It makes you want to jump up out of your seat and get jiggy with it. No? Just us?

Salsa

Jimmy and Alex were the first dancing duo to perform the Salsa in Episode 4! 

The Salsa dates back to the early 20th century in Eastern Cuba, where the dance was performed to different Caribbean rhythms and instruments. It’s an oldie, but a goodie.

Most of the movement in a Salsa occurs in the lower half of the dancer’s body, as they shift their bodyweight from foot to foot – front to back or side to side. It’s slick, and super impressive.

Missed Latin Night? Catch up on Episode 4 on 10 play