The men’s rights doco that’s dividing the country

Published: 08 June 2017

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The Project The Red Pill
The Project The Red Pill
You're watching The Project The Red Pill We speak to Cassie Jaye, the director of the controversial documentary about Men's Rights Activists that has had Aussie screenings pulled, about how she responds to critics of the film.

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Tonight, Cassie Jaye talks about how making a film changed her stance

Cassie Jaye in a scene from The Red Pill
Image © 2016 Cassie Jaye

The Red Pill is a film that’s sparked controversy all around the world, nowhere more so than in Australia, where screenings have been cancelled after petitioning.

Director Cassie Jaye says she set out to make a documentary to expose the Men’s Rights movement in America as a bunch of misogynists.

But the film she ended up making describes a journey she takes into the world of Men’s Rights Activists (MRAs), and a change of heart she has towards them – to the point where she concludes that she can no longer call herself a feminist.

Cassie says that she has made a fair and balanced film, highlighting areas in which men in the US are statistically disadvantaged, such as suicide rates, deaths in the workplace, college graduation and custody battles.

But critics say that she’s been bought out by MRAs who helped fund the finished film, and has airbrushed over issues of domestic violence, institutionalised sexism and rape culture.

“Cassie, you’ve gotta do some research, mate,” writer Van Badham tells The Project. “It is really hard to be a woman and you can be talented and you can even be rich and you can have many, many privileges and yet you can still find yourself in a situation where your gender is the reason that you can’t advance or actualise or enjoy equality or feel safe.”

Tonight on The Project, we speak to Cassie about the film, the response it’s received in Australia, and how she responds to criticisms which she has received.